Camber adjustment

cheechy

A2OC Donor
Has anyone tried these? Do they work.

Have to say they look dodgy to me but maybe someone has better info to hand!

camber adjustment shims

Realised they potentially only add camber and not toe...
 
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depronman

A2OC Donor
Exactly were does one but this shim on the A2 rear suspension setup ?


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cheechy

A2OC Donor
Exactly were does one but this shim on the A2 rear suspension setup ?


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I dont pretend to understand how these things work Paul hence why I'm asking the question!

The only reason for the ask is the whole thing about lowered cars and offset camber.
 

timmus

A2OC Donor
I believe the idea is that this shim (or just a sector of the shim) is placed between the torsion beam (the main body of the rear axle) and the bolt-on stub axles. Behind item 12 in the image below...

1588169884009.png


Cheers,

Tom
 

depronman

A2OC Donor
I understand how the A2 rear suspension works and I can’t see we’re this would be fitted to rectify neg camber

On suspension where the wheel hub is bolted to the suspension then there is scope to shim the housing to alter the wheel to chassis geometry. Indeed I did the very same thing on my focus cc3 about 9 years ago as it was eating rear tyre in one side only. It worked a treat and restored the camber angle and stopped the tyre wear
But I don’t see this as possible on the A2 rear suspension but I can’t fully remember how the rear stub axles attach to the subframe. If bolted then it’s a maybe.
Paul


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depronman

A2OC Donor
I understand how the A2 rear suspension works and I can’t see we’re this would be fitted to rectify neg camber

On suspension where the wheel hub is bolted to the suspension then there is scope to shim the housing to alter the wheel to chassis geometry. Indeed I did the very same thing on my focus cc3 about 9 years ago as it was eating rear tyre in one side only. It worked a treat and restored the camber angle and stopped the tyre wear
But I don’t see this as possible on the A2 rear suspension but I can’t fully remember how the rear stub axles attach to the subframe. If bolted then it’s a maybe.
Paul


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Thanks for the picture Tom. It’s as I described above for the Focus mod I did

You can adjust camber and toe using the shim

Paul


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Jellybean

Admin Team
Thanks for the picture Tom. It’s as I described above for the Focus mod I did

You can adjust camber and toe using the shim

Paul


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Guys surely the Stub Axle Flange to the main Beam is a face to face fit or if shimmed then a full face shim. Any angular seating would put undue stress on the retaining bolts?

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spike

Well-Known Member
I'd guess the shim is a pair of micro wedge shaped washers which you index round to give the desired offset. I assume it's then orientated to give the desired combination of camber and toe when sandwiched between the stub axle and mounting flange. Being plastic it's then drilled for the mounting bolts. The shim looks large enough to provide full face contact of the flanges - though it still goes against the (engineering) grain to shove a bit of plastic between quite highly stressed steel flanges.

Cheers Spike
 

timmus

A2OC Donor
Guys surely the Stub Axle Flange to the main Beam is a face to face fit or if shimmed then a full face shim. Any angular seating would put undue stress on the retaining bolts?
I'd guess the shim is a pair of micro wedge shaped washers which you index round to give the desired offset. I assume it's then orientated to give the desired combination of camber and toe when sandwiched between the stub axle and mounting flange. Being plastic it's then drilled for the mounting bolts. The shim looks large enough to provide full face contact of the flanges - though it still goes against the (engineering) grain to shove a bit of plastic between quite highly stressed steel flanges.
I suspect you're both right. The graphic in my first post demonstrates how they're designed to be fitted ...but I've absolutely zero intention of allowing them anywhere near my A2! :p
 

audifan

A2OC Donor
Probably the reason manufactures spend so much time and money working out the angles in the first place. Why mess when it was right to start with.
 

depronman

A2OC Donor
That ultra low look is just plain stupid. It would ruin a perfectly good car to achieve a look which is just wrong on every level

As to it stressing the mounting bolt and the use of plastic materials as shims - this is exactly what we do on the F35 fighter aircraft so if it’s good enough for an aircraft that goes at mach2 then it certainly good enough for a light weight road car

Personally I have no need for them because my A2 is std ride height

The plastic is soft when fitted and is designed to deform as you tighten the bolts. Once it deforms it sets to a hard consistency
At least that is how the plastic packers used on F35 work. The ridges are there to allow somewhere for the deformed material to go to

Cheers. Paul


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depronman

A2OC Donor
Yes as are military aircraft. Civil a/c tend to follow military a/c but about 20 years latter
Take carbon fibre as an example we used it on EAP the development a/c then lead to typhoon
EAP was flown in the late 80’s and had full carbon fibre wings and a lot of carbon fibre in the fuse
It took civil a/c a good 19 years to wake up to carbon fibre. We now have the 777 And some of the latter airbus a/c which use a lot of Carbon fibre replacing traditional aluminium

Cheers. Paul


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audifan

A2OC Donor
Phantoms I worked on in the'80s had a composite horizontal stabilizer, that aircraft type dates back to 1959. Civil aircraft including the deHavilland Comet and Boeing 707 also had composite flying control surfaces. I also have worked both sides of the "fence" since 1980 and am still involved today.
 

depronman

A2OC Donor
Phantoms I worked on in the'80s had a composite horizontal stabilizer, that aircraft type dates back to 1959. Civil aircraft including the deHavilland Comet and Boeing 707 also had composite flying control surfaces. I also have worked both sides of the "fence" since 1980 and am still involved today.
Agreed but that’s a few parts from composites
I’m thinking more making the full or a large part of the airframe from composite materials
I’ve seen the replacement of stretch form machines and wheeling machines used to form ally sheet in to panels with autoclaves and laser cutting machines over the last 35 years on the military side
Tornado was mainly aluminium and typhoon is 99% carbon fibre and Kevlar


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