Today I.....

Proghound

Admin Team
Today I finally managed to take some photos of the changes that have taken place on my fleet, including the upgrades that Tom @timmus put in while he was here.

My Crystal one has gone blonde! (but her roots are showing :D). This is the combination interior previously seen in my Cobalt car, except with Twist armrests since the black electric rear window ones had to stay in the Cobalt one.. Heated seat wiring is now added and functional, there's also a rear CD changer cable in place. Just needs the insertion of speed-nuts to fasten the changer frame to before we fit the actual CD changer panel in the rear. At that point my RNS-E Mk1 will also go into this car. Tom also put in a second boot-light, which will also be cut into the CD changer panel when it happens..

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My Cobalt one has gone back to black and now has the S3 seats that I had originally fitted to the Storm.

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Meanwhile the Storm now has its heater leather Sports seats back, and has been treated to a couple of goodies. There'll be more to come later this year too.

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dj_efk

A2OC Donor
I pulled the trigger on a Calix engine coolant pre-heater kit I've been mulling over in my blog thread: Total bill for the parts came to ~£158 as a trade sale from the UK dealer.

It'll be interesting to see how easily this can be fitted and whether it lives up to it's promises in daily use - I intend to use it all year round if possible to help speed the rather long warm-up time of up to 15 minutes for Merlin's ATL engine - although that's a long time to be in a freezing cold car in the winter for sure!

It won't ever pay for itself in fuel savings alone of course, but just like the PTW gearbox that Merlin is getting, I believe it will make living with the car on a daily basis much more pleasant. It will also provide inspiration for others to go the same way I hope. These engine pre-heaters are not popular in the UK perhaps they should be - I guess I'll find out!

Thanks to @Joga and @gills for the part they both played in getting me here.

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Rusty911

A2OC Donor
Today I reached the final leg of getting the current TDi (which I shall now call J(u)WK of Hazards) to change gear without protracted negotiations, feigned moves and forward planning.

1) Change gearbox oil using genuine VAG correct grade. Old oil looked basically O.K., honey coloured, no bits. New nearly clear. No noticeable improvement to change quality.

2) Removed gear selector assembly from interior. Strip right out, clean and reassemble with silicon grease. Moderate improvement.

3) Uncliped both cables from gearbox tower assembly and test gears at gearbox end. Not bad, but lubed everything as far as poss including cross-shaft, nylon slider and tipped oil down tower bearing area. Finished by ramming grease in everywhere followed by big clean up. Change improved a little.

4) Pulled bellows off each selector cable, filled up with engine oil and used bellows to help force oil up the cables, filled again and re-attached.

Conclusion? Sorted: change now feels very smooth and low in friction and 'rubberiness'. Not driven yet, but if it feels nice when stone cold, hard to see it'll be worse when warm. Odds are all that lube will just work its way in further and further and things will get a little better still.
 

Rusty911

A2OC Donor
Interested to see how this progresses.
If we weighed up the return on modifications I am sure none of us would bother modifying these cars!

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
Depends on how you quantify 'return'. Not sure how you price in satisfaction or knowing you have taken steps to safeguard against future issues.

I reckon 80% of my home car DIY has no 'return' as such, but then, from what I can gather from my brother, my niece and nephew have been an appalling investment: he's still waiting to see a profit 🙂.
 

Birchall

Dick Chown Award 2016
Today I finally managed to take some photos of the changes that have taken place on my fleet, including the upgrades that Tom @timmus put in while he was here.

My Crystal one has gone blonde! (but her roots are showing :D). This is the combination interior previously seen in my Cobalt car, except with Twist armrests since the black electric rear window ones had to stay in the Cobalt one.. Heated seat wiring is now added and functional, there's also a rear CD changer cable in place. Just needs the insertion of speed-nuts to fasten the changer frame to before we fit the actual CD changer panel in the rear. At that point my RNS-E Mk1 will also go into this car. Tom also put in a second boot-light, which will also be cut into the CD changer panel when it happens..

View attachment 69519View attachment 69520View attachment 69518View attachment 69517

My Cobalt one has gone back to black and now has the S3 seats that I had originally fitted to the Storm.

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Meanwhile the Storm now has its heater leather Sports seats back, and has been treated to a couple of goodies. There'll be more to come later this year too.

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Looking good.
I find that the second boot light is a really useful and practical mod.
When getting things out of the boot at night it is so easy to obstruct the one boot light and the result is - darkness. With the second one fitted you remove this annoying issue!!
well worth it.
Steve B
 

Rusty911

A2OC Donor
After a great chase around the houses, finally resolved the 'death lurch' on the TDi: story in the 7 page 'Toe' thread: last page has pics of the issue.

This, coupled with the shifter work, has really changed the way the car drives for the better. It's definitely getting there and beginning to feel pretty sorted. Once the rear axle bushes have been done (on order) the only suspension parts not to have either just been done or very recent will be the top mounts at the front, and they've been apart, cleaned and serviced. Drives very tight now.

Onwards ...
 

2work

A2OC Donor
Today I see something on eBay that I’ve wanted for a while:

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When I fitted TT pedals to my First A2 I enquires about these bespoke footrests but couldn’t find any answers to where they were manufactured.

I only come across this auction by a random search.

Does anyone have any information on where these came from and if it is possible to get more.

Kind regards,

Tom
Today I’m very annoyed!

I purchased this item last week and was hoping it would have arrived by the time I returned from my work travels. The seller informs me that the item has gone missing from stock.

The search continues for the bespoke footrest.

Is there anyone out there with any information on how we could get more of these produced. I’m now unable to find the old threads which will assist me getting in touch with the original fabricator.

Kind regards,

Tom
 

2work

A2OC Donor
Today I’m very annoyed!

I purchased this item last week and was hoping it would have arrived by the time I returned from my work travels. The seller informs me that the item has gone missing from stock.

The search continues for the bespoke footrest.

Is there anyone out there with any information on how we could get more of these produced. I’m now unable to find the old threads which will assist me getting in touch with the original fabricator.

Kind regards,

Tom
Just when Im unable to squeeze anything else into my ever growing daily agenda, I have now approached a company that will do it for us. Bit more work to be had in the background and will start a separate thread once ready.

Kind regards,

Tom
 

MattSnap

Member
Today I:
Collected my first own (I had a long term test car once) A2 tdi 90- 54plate silver with 17” sport alloys.
I filled it full of diesel and taxed it. I fed the symphony stereo the 6discs it munches in dash, I reset the date and time, and I jet washed it. I also cleaned all the glass inside and out with white vinegar, and removed a variety of sticky residues from stickers and road tar/film.
I also messaged Mike Swain, and worrried i had bought a dog (a vibration issue and the horn didn’t work-not the fuse!).
I also actively took part in this brilliant forum and introduced myself.
Thanks A2OC!
 

johnyfartbox

A2OC Donor
What a day,
The lads A2 had its MOT done yesterday, fail on two points.
1...nearside outer cv boot split.
2...nearside rear brake only reaching 30% so that's a fail.
It was making an horrendous noise when brake was applied.
So this morning, got a pair of cv boots and a set of rear brake shoes.
Tools out, nice day, let's get this sorted.
Wheel off, hub off, then noticed the brake cylinder was weeping, luckily I got two when I changed the offside a few weeks ago.
Then came the first smack in the face.
Using the twelve point socket I bought for the other side and taking off the nut I noticed that the bearing was FUBAR, loads of movement, I'm supprised it wasn't making a noise like the other one did and not picked up at the MOT.
So I thought, ok pull it off, go pick a new one up and replace when the cylinder and shoes were replaced.
HO NO, not that simple.
I eventually managed to get the bearing off, well, the main part of it but the back part of the bearing was stuck fast and I mean really stuck.


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So over two hours later using heat and cold chisels it moved, but how the eck it got that way is beyond me.
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I even had to smooth file the shaft because the new bearing when slid on was sticking and just incase I had to remove it at a later stage I didn't wa to destroy it getting it off.
So, the new one just slides on now, nice and snug.
Tomorrow I will attempt to rebuild the new brake shoes.
Oh, the brake cylinder was also a bit of a pain but with plenty of penetrating spray it came off without stripping or breaking a bolt /screw.
Am I correct in thinking that the best way to put the springs back on is to do it in a vice first then offer up the shoes for final fixing?
 

audifan

A2OC Donor
The easiest way is with the hub off, sorry. You fit the slave cylinder to the back plate, assemble the shoes and springs complete, attach the hand brake cable, then fit the upper ends into the recess of the slave cylinder pistons, then hook them over the lower fixed point. Fit the retaining pins through the back plate and then fit the hub. Cover with the drum then bleed / flush the brakes and clutch slave. Make sure the handbrake is working correctly and is adjusted as follows


The handbrake must be adjusted after charging/adjusting the service brake system. The service brake system must be fully functional.

The handbrake cables must not be under tension.

Resetting is only required after replacing the handbrake cables, the brake carrier or brake pads.

  • ‒ Release handbrake.
  • ‒ Remove the rear storage compartment.
  • ‒ Firmly press brake pedal several times.
  • ‒ Pull handbrake lever 4 notches.

A46-0142

  • ‒ → Tighten adjusting nut -arrow- until both wheels are difficult to turn by hand.
  • ‒ Release handbrake and check, whether both wheels can spin freely. If necessary, screw back adjusting nut slightly.
 

johnyfartbox

A2OC Donor
The easiest way is with the hub off, sorry. You fit the slave cylinder to the back plate, assemble the shoes and springs complete, attach the hand brake cable, then fit the upper ends into the recess of the slave cylinder pistons, then hook them over the lower fixed point. Fit the retaining pins through the back plate and then fit the hub. Cover with the drum then bleed / flush the brakes and clutch slave. Make sure the handbrake is working correctly and is adjusted as follows


The handbrake must be adjusted after charging/adjusting the service brake system. The service brake system must be fully functional.

The handbrake cables must not be under tension.

Resetting is only required after replacing the handbrake cables, the brake carrier or brake pads.

  • ‒ Release handbrake.
  • ‒ Remove the rear storage compartment.
  • ‒ Firmly press brake pedal several times.
  • ‒ Pull handbrake lever 4 notches.

A46-0142

  • ‒ → Tighten adjusting nut -arrow- until both wheels are difficult to turn by hand.
  • ‒ Release handbrake and check, whether both wheels can spin freely. If necessary, screw back adjusting nut slightly.
Brilliant,
Brakes built up and waiting to be put back on.
 
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