50mpg from 1.4TDI90 on long trip - normal?

Edwrai

Member
Although Audi quoted similar mpg figures for both the TDI 75 and 90 variants in the real world and having owned numerous 75's and a couple of 90's the difference in mpg is huge BUT in favour of the 75 like 99.9% of people who have owned them will agree and by around 8-10 mpg from my experience.

To average 78mpg in either of my 90's i would have needed to be going downhill with the clutch depressed

Mpg in the 50's is pretty much the norm for a 90 and 60's for a 75.

These figures are obviously dependant on everything being in tip top order and working as they should. No binding rear brakes, under pressure tyres and faulty temp sender/thermostats

Here is 20k of travelling I tracked before getting bored of filling in the app


e57aa05d1d5d439ba29f21792b0fc945.jpg



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Edwrai

Member
Although Audi quoted similar mpg figures for both the TDI 75 and 90 variants in the real world and having owned numerous 75's and a couple of 90's the difference in mpg is huge BUT in favour of the 75 like 99.9% of people who have owned them will agree and by around 8-10 mpg from my experience.

To average 78mpg in either of my 90's i would have needed to be going downhill with the clutch depressed

Mpg in the 50's is pretty much the norm for a 90 and 60's for a 75.

These figures are obviously dependant on everything being in tip top order and working as they should. No binding rear brakes, under pressure tyres and faulty temp sender/thermostats

Honestly I can’t get my 90 below 50-55 mpg even if I drove it flat out everywhere.


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PaulHa

Member
The spritmonitor.de search tool suggests an average of 58.25 mpg for the 75 Tdi (243 vehicles) and 57.17 mpg from the 90 TDi (137 vehicles).

I have averaged 66.2 mpg in my TDi 90 over the last 10 years with light footed driving as measured at the tank on refills, although having upgraded to Bridgestone Turanza T005 tyres ('B' rated rolling resistance) 2 years ago the average has been 70.9 mpg - so tyres can make quite a difference- but limiting your maximum highway speed probably has as big an impact.
 

dj_efk

A2OC Donor
Hi all,

Just to add some nice colour to this thread - I stumbled across an ancient post by @Jeetesh from 2007 (Impressive stamina with the A2 and this forum considering he's still with us!) so @Jeetesh I hope you don't mind me sharing your wisdom here on what you've found works well for improving our cars' fuel consumption:

a few hints and tips

- Add a couple of psi to each tyre, it decreases rolling resistance, Michelin Pilot premacy tend to be good for economy, better than bridgestones or pirellis
- remove all unnecessary junk we all carry in our cars
- ensure oil is topped up
- try a fuel additive, this added 3-4 mpg to my car
- remove the back seats, this would add circa 6mpg although not good for security as it leaves items exposed. If you have surprise passengers its not good so this ones a bit extreme. It does however improve overall performance for nothing, fantastic for outrunning rep mobiles on motoways.
- Ease off towards red lights and avoid stopping where possible
- Dont sit with the engine running unnecessarily
- Turn the climate to economy mode
- Drive where possible at constant speeds without heavy acceleration or deceleration
- drive behind some one else in strong head winds on motorways (not tailgating), you'd be surprised at the difference this makes
- Turn off unnecessary electrical items, heated seats etc. This you probably wont notice any difference.

I used to do most of these things and I would average anywhere between 60 and 70mpg regularly and this was diased towards motorway to urban 60%/40% respectively.

Previous comments on that area of the country make a huge difference, when I was living in Essex I would get circa 10mpg more than where I now live in Halifax.
 
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